Spring Holidays 2020: Karamea short walks

Another rainy day is forecast. Got up early to see some of the Karamea top sights.

Big Rimu Walk:
The track leads through regenerated forest dotted with Nikau palms, ending at a spectacular Rimu, 36 m high and 2 m wide.
The tree, which might be 1000 years old, escaped being felled my loggers in the 1940s.
The walk is a very informative botanical path, signs at random endemic trees show us what their names are.
Kareao, Supplejack (Ripogonum scandens) – The vines provided strong lashings for construction, thatching and fencing and for coarse baskets, stretchers etc. Growing tips are edible and the plant was used to tret skin disorders.
Rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum) – Astringent gum was used to stop bleeding from wounds in early days.
Makomako, Wineberry (Aristotelia serrata) – Leaves boiled with a little water, liquid used on burns, and for rheumatism.
Kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa) – The inner bark has a high tannin content and used as a fawn coloured dye for flax colouring.
Kawakawa (Macropiper excelsum) – Maori used the leaves as poultices to treat bruises and decoctions of the leaves and fruit were used for treating toothache, boils and stomach ailments.
Unfolding wheki (Dicksonia squarrosa).
Back at the start.
Estuary Walk:
Why do one walk when you can do two?

Karamea River mudflats.
Shell crusher from the 1920s when settlers were struggling to find fertiliser for their land.
Old bridge.
Scratching with the elongated arm.
The tide coming in and the Karamea radio towers.
Right, still some hours of today left. Another walk?
Zig-zag on the radio tower plateau to have views of the Karamea plains and look at an very old cemetary.
The tiny fern babies on a tree trunk.
Chose to walk back over the plateau in the direction of the sea, added another 8 km lol
But nice views.
Back on the ground level: A random farm.
Us, on the road and the kids realise how big these signs are.
Almost at the bridge.
Almost at the car park :D
No more walks today!